Italian Riviera artichoke pie: recipe and history

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Italian Riviera artichoke pie - torta pasqualina genovese
Italian Riviera artichoke pie - torta pasqualina genovese

What to do when a huge box of fresh, flavoured, thorny artichokes– a present of your trusted farmer –  stand mocking on the table of your kitchen? You watch it, you try to ignore it, than you watch it again and eventually you give up. That’s how it goes. You arm yourself with a knife, a big bowl full of water, a couple of lemons and a great deal of patience. And you start cleaning, cleaning, cleaning and again cleaning artichokes.

Then – provided that in the meantime the sun hasn’t set – with your hands aching for the scratches and the tips of your fingers darkened by the chlorophyll, you eventually have fun and start preparing the Italian Riviera artichoke pie, one of the best ever springy pie and deserved reward for the hard work done!

This is what I actually learned a couple of days ago after an afternoon spent cleaning artichokes, and here below you can find the traditional recipe of the artichoke pie I used and which is reported in all the ancient regional cook books.

Before that, however, I wish to make a quick jump in Genoese cuisine history with regards to vegetable pies and then to give you some tips to make the artichoke pie as a real Genoese cook (feel free to go directly to the recipe, I know I’m a bit wordy this time).

 
Italian Riviera artichoke pie - torta pasqualina genovese
Italian Riviera artichoke pie - torta pasqualina genovese
Some history of the Genoa cuisine and of its vegetable pies 

You should know that Genoa and the Italian Riviera are famous for their vegetable pies, of very ancient origin actually. Indeed, at the beginning of the middle ages in Genoa –  a powerful Mariner Republic – many extremely rich merchants, bankers, brokers and insurers lived. This people could afford tangible luxuries and very refined consumptions.

Their high standard of welfare reflected directly in the kitchens and on these patrician-merchants’ tables skilled cooks used to serve more and more sophisticated dishes.They worked, modified and cleverly combined the raw materials (never lacking in Genoa where the port docks overflew of goods).

Whilst in the middle Europe and in the countryside castles the nobles showed off their power and prosperity serving on their tables at most roasted meats, Genoese were perfecting the arts of pasta making, of filled pasta and pies, of sauces and of the use of spices and aromatic herbs.

The patrician cooks, in particular, learned to prepare dishes wisely combining the ingredients at their disposal e.g.  fresh cheeses (coming from the backcountry valleys or from Sardinia) vegetables (from the vegetable gardens farmed in the valleys behind the port area) spices (coming from the trade with the Middle East) and nuts (pine nuts, walnuts almonds: their use was learned in the East and on the Black Sea). Furthermore, a warm weather did not require a huge number of calories intake and the merchant profession did not imply particular physical efforts. All these factors brought to the development in Genoa of a very light diet, mainly based on pasta and vegetables, sophisticated and of very high nutritional quality. In other words, the precursor of the well-known Mediterranean diet.

And in this context vegetal pies appeared on the tables: shells made of multiple layers of puff pastry, filled with seasonal vegetables (chards, wild herbs – such as the famous prebuggiun – artichokes, pumpkin), fresh cheese, eggs, aromatic herbs and spices. The Genoese artichokes pies, in particular, was a very refined dish  usually served at Easter on closing of the artichokes’ season.

Italian Riviera artichoke pie - torta pasqualina genovese
 
Some tips and tricks for preparing the Italian Riviera artichoke pie
  1. The ultimate cheese for making Genoese vegetable pies is prescinsêua,  a renneted cheese typical of Genoa backcountry. In the city of Genoa this cheese is easy to find in the supermarket sold in . Outside Genoa, on the other hand, it is quite rare, as it doesn’t have a long life span, so it can’t really be shipped far from where it is made. However, in making vegetables pie you can substituted this cheese with ricotta, as Genoese housewives actually do from time to time (but in this case omit to add the flour provided for in the recipe). Or if you wish to keep the sour taste of prescinsêua the perfect substitution, according to my experience, is 2/3 of ricotta cheese and 1/3 of sour cream or Greek yogurt.
  2. Be sure to make very thin sheets of pasta, this is the challenge of the recipe! To obtain a very elastic dough it is very important to work it hard and for a long time at the beginning and then to leave it rest for a while to let the fibres soften. Dust very well with flour the working surface and the dough as well when you roll and stretch it.
  3. have fun and try to inflate the pie: leave a small hole in the dough before sealing the filling, blow through it under the last sheet of dough and quickly seal it. During cooking the dough will harden and crack and maybe will crush. It doesn’t matter! The pies will look delicious and very handmade and the thin crumbs are so good!
Italian Riviera artichoke pie - torta pasqualina genovese
Italian Riviera artichoke pie - torta pasqualina genovese
The traditional recipe of the Italian Riviera artichoke pie


And here is a step-by-step guide !

Italian Riviera artichoke pie - torta pasqualina genovese
Italian Riviera artichoke pie - torta pasqualina genovese
Italian Riviera artichoke pie - torta pasqualina genovese
Italian Riviera artichoke pie - torta pasqualina genovese
Italian Riviera artichoke pie - torta pasqualina genovese
Italian Riviera artichoke pie - torta pasqualina genovese
Italian Riviera artichoke pie - torta pasqualina genovese
Italian Riviera artichoke pie - torta pasqualina genovese
Italian Riviera artichoke pie - torta pasqualina genovese
Italian Riviera artichoke pie - torta pasqualina genovese
Italian Riviera artichoke pie - torta pasqualina genovese

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Ciao! I’m Enrica

a home cook, food researcher and experience curator born and bred in Liguria.
I study, tell, cook, share and teach Ligurian cuisine and the culture surrounding it.
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