Cuttlefish with chards (seppie in zimino)

Jump to recipe

Spring is the right time to buy cuttlefish, it’s their season. This is clear in my mind when I enter the Genoa covered market (Mercato Orientale) almost breathless, arms already loaded with innumerable bags and a tired son hang up to one of them.

A swirling ride through the market benches – overflowing vegetables, scattered boxes, mountains of dried fruit, people, colors, fragrance of bread, strawberries and artichokes – and we come to the curve of the fish counters.

There my cuttlefish. Sprawled, placid, between a shimmering two-metres spatula fish and a family of zebra-striped mackerels. We take 4 and run away, this without having being first presented with the giant head of the spatula fish! Someone, in fact, later on in the kitchen, will put on a miners’ torch and bent on the sink will study for hours the anatomy of a fish.

Mercato Orientale di Genova (Genoa East Market)

Cuttlefish mission, the last of the day, done. The chards that will serve to prepare  “seppie in zimino” (cuttlefish with chards), the dish I thought as the fisherman was making my bill, are already in the fridge.

And then we come home, we close the door behind us, letting outside the world, we take off our shoes, put down the bags, get into the kitchen and start cooking the meal, together.

Quiet, finally.

seppie in zimino ingredients

 

 


cuttlefish with chards (seppie in zimino), a traditional recipe of the Italian Riviera

cuttlefish with chards (seppie in zimino), a traditional recipe of the Italian Riviera

 

 

More information about cuttlefish with chards (seppie in zimino)

Cuttlefish “in zimino” are a very ancient dish of the Italian Riviera (and the Tuscan) tradition.

The expression “in zimino” refers to those dishes where a main protein ingredient (cuttlefish, chickpeas, tripe, codfish) is cooked with chards (spinach in Tuscany) and tomato sauce. The term probably comes from the Arabic “samin”, which means a “dense sauce”, and indeed all of these dishes are very liquid, almost a soup, and should be tasted with slices of toast (maybe rubbed with a clove of garlic) .

It is a very simple dish to prepare, light and delicate. In my opinion it matches well both with white wine and with a light red wine, such as our rossese.

If you want to try another variant, I can recommend you the chickpeas and chards soup (ceci in zimino) recipe, a real soup and perhaps more suitable for a winter dinner.

 

cuttlefish with chards (seppie in zimino), a traditional recipe of the Italian Riviera

 


Cuttlefish with chards (seppie "in zimino"). A traditional recipe of the Italian Riviera

 

DON’T MISS A POST! SUBSCRIBE TO MY NEWSLETTER

[mc4wp_form id=”611″]


Ciao! I’m Enrica

a home cook, food researcher and experience curator bred and born in Liguria.
I study, tell, cook, share and teach Ligurian cuisine and the culture surrounding it.
Here we celebrate Liguria’s gastronomic diversity and richness through its recipes, producers, traditions and shops.

My Book

Travel design

You may also like

Genoa style artichokes frittata: february.

Genoa style artichokes frittata: february.

February is the month when, here in Liguria, the first artichokes appear on the stalls of the market. The most coveted, the best, are the artichokes of Albenga, better known as thorny violet artichokes of Albenga (carciofo violetto di Albenga). Their peculiarity? The...

read more
Pumpkin Farinata

Pumpkin Farinata

If in Liguria you talk about farinata, everyone thinks of farinata genovese , the batter of water and chickpea flour cooked in the oven in large copper pans (named “testi”). Everyone, though, except the inhabitants of Sestri Ponente,  an ancient large district of...

read more
Zembi d’arzillo, the Ligurian fish ravioli

Zembi d’arzillo, the Ligurian fish ravioli

Large fish ravioli – round or square – are characteristic of the entire Ligurian coast. The filling consists of white fish flesh (preferably rock fish, very tasty), escarole and borage. As to the curious name of this preparation, “zembi” might come from the Arabic...

read more

Join me on my food journeys