Borages tartlets, roaming the fields.

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Italian Riviera drywalls and narrow terraces_ asmallkitcheningenoa

I love wild herbs.  But above all I love harvesting them. On Spring, in the lawn, at the bottom of drywalls or at the borders of the streets where they love growing.

Walking in the middle of the nature, our first true home. The pungent odour of the hearth warmed by the sun, the busy buzzing of the bees, the swish of the leaves cradled by the wind, the creaking of the shoes stepping on the rests of the dry winter.

The eyes wander around, in all directions, eventually free from the narrow borders of a smartphone screen.

wild herbs_ borages_asmallkitcheningenoa

And then there is the harvesting. An ancestral gesture, marked in our genetic memory forever.

Kneeling down, genuflecting out of respect and gratitude for nature,  for what she stretches out of the ground.

In that very moment when your hand grabs the turgid leaves, just before tearing them off, you and nature are one and the same, and your soul remember the ancient agreement for survival entered with nature.

Harvesting and then bringing everything at home, for cooking. Right away. The scent of chlorophyll that fill the kitchen opening the bag and that amplifies when the herbs are put in fresh water. A scent that during cooking changes, transforms, and becomes the deep taste of a morning spent in the fields.

My last walk along drywalls and narrow terraces clinging on the sea resulted in a big basket of borages with their small elegant indigo flowers. That morning this poem of the Polish poet Czeslaw Milosz came to my mind:

At home, then, I decided to do something new, something different with these wild herbs.  No more fresh pasta, savoury pies, frittatas or veggie balls. No, I decided to trust my intuition and prepare that bizarre recipe I found in an old book of my granny’s dedicated to the use of wild herbs in the kitchen, in patisserie as well. And so borages tartlets!

borages tartlets: foraging wild herbs for a shortcrust dessert
borages tartlets: foraging wild herbs for a shortcrust dessert
borages tartlets: shortcrust pastry, ricotta cheese, borages, orange peel and cinnamon

The result was so much surprising that I’m quite confident to share it. These borages tartlets are perfect for a picnic (maybe for the traditional one – at least here in Italy – of Easter Monday) but they are good as well warm just brought out of the oven. In both cases they will surprise you and your guest, at least for the  illusion to have in your hands a savory pie!

And every bite  will be like taking a step in a sunny lawn.

borages tartlets: foraging wild herbs for a shortcrust dessert
borages tartlets: foraging wild herbs for a shortcrust dessert
borages tartlets_ asmallkitcheningenoa


As I am a book shopping addict, especially when it comes to deepen a new subject on my head, yesterday I bought the book (in Italian of course) “Hidden Natural Histories | Herbs | The secret properties of 150 plants“. It’s a very nice book, with a lot of colorful and detailed drawings (see the one above on borages) and many interesting stories, informations and legends on the most common wild plants. If you are interest in harvesting wild herbs by your self (and prepare these borages tartlets) you should go for it!

Finally, if you want to know something about the bouquet of wild herbs that traditionally is used in the Italian Riviera cooking,  you can read my post “Prebuggiun: wild herbs in the Italian Riviera cuisine

Happy harvest! Happy baking!

borages tartlets: herbs in a dessert
borages tartlets: herbs in a dessert
borages tartlets: herbs in a dessert
wild herbs pastry_ borages tartlets_ asmallkitcheningenoa

Ciao! I’m Enrica

a home cook, food researcher and experience curator born and bred in Liguria.
I study, tell, cook, share and teach Ligurian cuisine and the culture surrounding it.
Here we celebrate Liguria’s gastronomic diversity and richness through its recipes, producers, traditions and shops.

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